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Reclaiming Academic Primacy in Higher Education: The Revised IRS Form 990 Can Accelerate the Process

The revised Form 990, “Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax,” filed by many public charities and other exempt organizations, has the potential to fully expose the Achilles’ Heel of the NCAA and its member institutions – the extremely weak, if any, educational basis for the current financial structure of big-time college sports. This would […]

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How Colleges Cope with a Perfect Storm

How Colleges Cope with a Perfect Storm Among other things, schools must confront sports related academic corruption, sexual abuse and serious drinking problems. By Frank G. Splitt, 10-03-18 Download as PDF Introduction – Though our nation’s sports-and-money driven colleges and universities are still considered to be the envy of the world, this exalted stature raises a […]

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Athletic Scholarship Rules Should be Clear

Former California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger signed the Student-Athletes’ Right to Know Act last fall. This requires California colleges and universities to publicly disclose, among other things, their policies regarding sports-related medical expenses and the renewal or cancellation of athletic scholarships.  A similar bill is before the Connecticut General Assembly. This bill is long overdue. Follow […]

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Ralph Nader and “Pay for Play”

Even the consumer advocate and former presidential candidate Ralph Nader, a relative newcomer to the debate over paying college athletes, was able to use the media frenzy around March Madness to launch his own proposal to eliminate athletic scholarships altogether. The tepid to hostile reaction his proposal brought in many circles, including at the NCAA, […]

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Long Time Critic Applauds NCAA Action on Multiyear Scholarships for Athletes

Much to my surprise the NCAA, under the leadership of President Mark Emmert, has recently enacted financial aid reforms that I have supported for many years. Critics have argued that the changes amount to little more than “window dressing,” but a strong case can be made that the revival of multi-year scholarships makes athletes students […]

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After Penn State Scandal, Congress Should Make NCAA put Students, Education First

In light of the scandal at Penn State, which reveals how big-time college sports often overwhelm the core values of higher education, Congress should closely examine whether the NCAA is running a not-for-profit enterprise or a commercial entertainment empire. Follow this link to read the Christian Science Monitor article

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NCAA Deserves Criticism, but Got it Right on Scholarships

The revival of multiyear scholarships, one of several measures the Division I Board of Directors adopted at a presidential retreat, is potentially the most important student- oriented legislation passed in recent history. Follow this link to read the Indianapolis Star Tribune article

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Drake Group Urges NCAA Division I Presidents to Support the Establishment of a Presidential Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics

PRESS RELEASE – MARCH 22, 2016 For immediate release For more information: Gerald S. Gurney, President, Drake Group (405) 249-5835 geraldgurney@gmail.com http://www.TheDrakeGroup.org Drake Group Urges NCAA Division I Presidents to Support the Establishment of a Presidential Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics  WEST HAVEN, CONN — Listing eleven current conditions that threaten the financial stability of college […]

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Real Scholarships Need to Make a Comeback: Athletes Should Be Paid with Multiyear Scholarships

I have always believed that colleges and universities that treat athletes like employees should have to pay them and provide other employment benefits. Under common law, an employee is a person who performs services for another under a contract of hire, subject to the Follow this link to read the US News and World Report […]

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How to Save the NCAA from Itself

Big-time college football has changed significantly since I played decades ago. Millions of dollars rain down from ticket sales, luxury suites, media rights, corporate sponsorships, and sales of licensed apparel. Conferences are realigned to penetrate new target markets. These changes, however, raise serious questions about the future of sport in higher education. Follow this link […]

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