Tag Archives: Athlete Compensation

Drake Group Promotes an Educational Alternative to “Athlete Employees”

The Drake Group has released a position statement today that proposes an educational alternative to “athlete employees.” Drake Group President Gerald Gurney, stated, “Intercollegiate athletics is at a crossroads on the issue of paying college athletes. Should collegiate athletics be a mini-version of the NFL and NBA? See Drake’s Position Statement for a viable alternative.

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Drake Group Report: O’Bannon, Amateurism, and the Viability of College Sport

Our goal in this report is to provide information on whether NCAA restrictions on athletes’ free participation in the lucrative market for their images, likenesses and names is necessary either to uphold the principles of amateurism or to preserve the activity of intercollegiate athletics. The Drake Group is a national organization of faculty and others, […]

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Drake Group Scholarship Proposal Adopted By NCAA

In 2004, several members of the Drake Group carried picket signs on the sidewalk in front of the Hyatt Hotel in San Antonio where the basketball coaches were staying during the Final Four. Liz Clarke from the Washington Post described the Drake members as “graying university professors trying to sell something radical. The product they’re […]

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TDG Presidents Meet with Ralph Nader to Discuss College Sports

Drake Group officers Jason Lanter, Kadie Otto, and Allen Sack met with consumer advocate Ralph Nader last summer to discuss Nader’s proposal to replace athletic scholarships with need-based financial aid in college sports. According Lanter, the immediate past president of The Drake Group, “Nader’s defense of need-based aid for athletes in big-time college sports places […]

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Athletic Scholarship Rules Should be Clear

Former California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger signed the Student-Athletes’ Right to Know Act last fall. This requires California colleges and universities to publicly disclose, among other things, their policies regarding sports-related medical expenses and the renewal or cancellation of athletic scholarships.  A similar bill is before the Connecticut General Assembly. This bill is long overdue. Follow […]

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Ralph Nader and “Pay for Play”

Even the consumer advocate and former presidential candidate Ralph Nader, a relative newcomer to the debate over paying college athletes, was able to use the media frenzy around March Madness to launch his own proposal to eliminate athletic scholarships altogether. The tepid to hostile reaction his proposal brought in many circles, including at the NCAA, […]

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Long Time Critic Applauds NCAA Action on Multiyear Scholarships for Athletes

Much to my surprise the NCAA, under the leadership of President Mark Emmert, has recently enacted financial aid reforms that I have supported for many years. Critics have argued that the changes amount to little more than “window dressing,” but a strong case can be made that the revival of multi-year scholarships makes athletes students […]

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NCAA Deserves Criticism, but Got it Right on Scholarships

The revival of multiyear scholarships, one of several measures the Division I Board of Directors adopted at a presidential retreat, is potentially the most important student- oriented legislation passed in recent history. Follow this link to read the Indianapolis Star Tribune article

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Real Scholarships Need to Make a Comeback: Athletes Should Be Paid with Multiyear Scholarships

I have always believed that colleges and universities that treat athletes like employees should have to pay them and provide other employment benefits. Under common law, an employee is a person who performs services for another under a contract of hire, subject to the Follow this link to read the US News and World Report […]

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It is their Legal Right to Unionize

I have always believed that colleges and universities that treat athletes like employees should have to pay them and provide other employment benefits. Under common law, an employee is a person who performs services for another under a contract of hire, subject to the other’s control in return for payment. The unionization movement at Northwestern […]

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